Category: Articles

SPONSORED: Innovative solution is the only complete flashing system specifically for 6-inch, single-wythe CMU walls.

Mortar Net Solutions introduced a new 6-inch size of its BlockFlash™ flashing solution for single-wythe exterior concrete masonry unit walls. BlockFlash is a complete, embeddable flashing solution for managing moisture in CMU walls. It uses patented flashing pans to collect moisture in the wall and channel it to the exterior through integrated weep spouts. The spouts are gray in color to blend in with standard mortar, and factory-installed insect guards prevent insects from entering the block cells through the spouts. Drainage mesh placed in every block cell in the course immediately above the pans provides hundreds of clear pathways for water to flow around mortar droppings inside the cells, where it is collected by the pans. Mortar Net’s BlockFlash cuts installation time associated with using membrane flashing by approximately 50 percent and eliminates the need for multiple architectural CMU sizes that are typical with through-wall flashing. BlockFlash for 6-inch CMU works the same as the 8-, 10- and 12-inch versions, and was designed to meet the growing popularity of utilizing 6-inch CMUs in building construction to help meet building energy codes and for its space-saving benefits in larger buildings. For more information, please click here to visit Mortar Net...

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Painter’s Corner: MCAA Magazine

MCAA Magazine Jerry Painter   Question: How Close is Too Close? Have you ever had someone or something encroach on your personal space so badly that you wanted to scream “Back Off!”? So how close is too close? When my daughters were in high school, they went to a school that had a “Six Inch Rule”. Boys and girls had a 6” rule of separation. Now, as most of you fathers of daughters know, six inches is simply not enough! A distance that can be critical for a masonry contractor is the distance from which masonry should be viewed to determine its acceptability. If we have reached the point of trying to view the masonry from a certain distance, we already have a problem. ASTM C90 Section 7 is titled “Finish & Appearance of Concrete Masonry Units”. Paragraph 7.2 says and I quote, “Where units are to be used in exposed wall construction, the face or faces that are to be exposed shall not show chips or cracks, not otherwise permitted in 7.1.2 and 7.1.3, or other imperfections when viewed from a distance of not less than 20 ft. (6.1m)under diffused lighting”. So, there it is folks, the magic 20’-0” rule. We have been using it for years to get everyone to back away from the wall. But let me tell you a little secret, ASTM C90 is a...

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Blast From The Past: Bill Dentinger

Publisher’s Note: One of my favorite features in Masonry has always been the Chairman’s Message. The sad thing is, readers hear from the MCAA Chairman for 24 issues of Masonry. Come the 25th issue, they are gone and for the most part not heard from again. In this new feature, we have asked our Past Chairmen to write a piece for us on what has happened since they were Chairman. It is a nice follow-up to what happened to them. This first run will feature Bill Dentinger, who served as MCAA President from 1984-1986. We hope you enjoy hearing...

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Tech Talk: How To Look At A Brick Wall

On some projects it just seems that nobody can agree on wall appearance, and what looks right to one person can be unacceptable to another. There may be complaints about mortar color, joint width, or cracks and chips in the brick. Some architects like to get up close with a straightedge or a magnifying glass when evaluating a wall – but both of these approaches are wrong! Luckily there is guidance within the building code and ASTM on how to judge masonry wall appearance. Construction tolerances. Masonry design and construction is covered in the TMS 402 Building Code and...

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A Bundle of Productivity: Grinders + Vacuums + Safety

  You make a mess ~ you clean it up. That’s a simple discipline that follows us throughout life, from the playroom, kitchen or classroom to the backyard, office, laboratory, workplace and construction job site. Grinding can be especially messy, and masonry grinders and vacuums go together like a ticker tape parade and a street sweeper. There are many instances of grinding that require great skill, human protection and the ubiquitous clean-up – like dental procedures, woodworking, metal grinding in a machine shop or auto body shop and masonry tasks. Varying levels of precision are involved, and there’s an...

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