Author: Bronzella Cleveland

Case Study: St. Augustine Apartments

In the Morrisania neighborhood of the South Bronx in New York City, the site of the old St. Augustine’s Church and school building is being given a second chance. A new 13-story structure is nearing construction completion, with a chocolate brown facade and beaming floor-to-ceiling windows. St. Augustine’s Church was a Roman Catholic parish founded in 1849. The Baroque and Renaissance Revival church itself was built in 1894, but after 117 years of serving the community, the church struggled with low attendance, high maintenance fees and impossible structural repairs. St. Augustine’s decided to merge with nearby Our Lady of...

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A Safer 2018: The Basics of Scaffolding Safety

SCAFFOLD INSPECTION Jobsite conditions are in a state of constant change. Weather conditions, activities by workers from other trades, and the wear from daily use can affect the integrity of equipment. Scaffolds are no exception. OSHA requires the inspection of scaffolds before each shift and after an event that could affect the scaffold’s structural integrity. Inspections must be performed by a competent person, but anyone who uses a scaffold should check for potential problems before use. When inspecting a scaffold you should check for physical defects in the scaffold and environmental conditions, which affect safety as well as OSHA...

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Translation: Una nueva versión de una práctica tradicional

La idea del ladrillo delgado puede afectar a aquellos en la industria fuera de la pared, pero éste material ha llegado lejos desde su comienzo. Desde producción hasta instalación y duración, la industria del ladrillo/piedra delgada es una fuerza a tomar en cuenta. Es versátil, fácil de instalar y puede durar tanto como el ladrillo tradicional y puede ser puesto casi en cualquier lugar en un proyecto. Hay varias empresas pioneras en la industria del ladrillo delgado, Endicott Clay siendo una de las primeras en hacerlo. Ellos vieron que había necesidad de un producto que pudiera hacer más fácil...

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Full Swing

Full Swing Dan Kamys, Editor – dkamys@masonrymagazine.com One of the things that’s fun about working on MASONRY is all the opportunities for content that are available. With our primary goal being to provide information contractors will actually find useful, Bronzella and I have had a plethora of ideas to draw from. In this issue, you’ll start to see some topics that we’ve touched on before, but these stories are always worth a read. Here, we’re proud of the stories in this issue. Following up our historic January 2018 issue wasn’t easy, but there’s a bunch of useful and entertaining stories in this issue. How about our cover shot? The Cathedral of St. John the Divine is our first American Treasure of the year, and is absolutely impressive. While I had the chance to visit and photograph the Washington National Cathedral in the summer of last year, it’s interesting to see how the same type of building can look so different. Arguably the largest Anglican cathedral and church, this Cathedral is also the fifth largest Christian church in the world. The photos taken by our photographer are absolutely amazing. Additionally, you’ll see an interesting story on workforce development in this issue. ProBlock, one of our advertisers, found an interesting way to work with other companies to leverage the power of the regional Fastest Trowel on the Block competition. By inviting...

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Tech Talk: Arches

  Figure 1. Arch terminology from BIA Technical Notes 31. The arch is the most common, traditional method of spanning openings with masonry. The arch makes use of the high compressive strength inherent in masonry and, with proper geometry, doesn’t need reinforcing or supplemental support. The arch is an aesthetically pleasing form and one that just looks “right” in masonry. There are a fair number of arch specific terms that should be defined before we get into a discussion of masonry arch construction. Figure 1 below is taken from the Brick Industry Association’s (BIA) Technical Notes 31 and visually shows many of the commonly used terms related to arch construction. There are a number of common arch types including the jack arch (no rise), the segmental arch (pictured above), the semi-circular arch, the gothic arch, various multi-centered arches and several other less commonly used arches. For further information, BIA’s Technical Notes 31 provides examples of most masonry arch shapes. Arches can be formed with standard units with rectangular faces by tapering the mortar joints. Visually, arches constructed with special tapered units and uniform mortar joints have more aesthetic appeal. Figure 2. Garage openings on this project ranged from 9’ 8” to 12’ 8” in the veneer, however the architect specified a constant rise of 7 inches and a single soldier course depth for all the arches. As a result, many arches over the...

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