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200 Texas Cities Adopt Masonry Planning as Strategy


The adoption of masonry planning as a strategy for sustainable growth continues to gain favor among Texas cities, with 200 cities statewide now embracing the concept by adopting minimum requirements for masonry in new construction, according to the Texas Masonry Council.

The number of cities is about double the total of from five years ago, said Rudy Garza, TMC executive vice president. Although the number of cities is only about 16 percent of the 1,215 incorporated cities in Texas, the 200 that have embraced masonry planning are strategically located in the fastest growing regions of the state, Garza noted.

“This is where the growth is occurring,” he said. “These 200 forward-thinking cities in the major metropolitan areas of Dallas-Fort Worth, Austin, San Antonio and Houston, recognize that they have the power to determine whether the dramatic growth they are experiencing or potentially facing, will result in a safer environment and better quality of life for their residents.”

On Jan. 13, 2014, the city of Troy, in Central Texas just north of Temple, became the 200th city in Texas to adopt masonry requirements and masonry planning as a strategy for sustainable growth. Troy anticipates a surge in growth with the widening of IH-35 between Temple and Waco.

In its resolution justifying adoption of the masonry requirements, the Troy City Council, like the other masonry-friendly cities, cited multiple reasons:

- Masonry helps protect property values, provides for durable long-lasting structures, and helps ensure aesthetically pleasing structures and a stable tax-base;

- Masonry is the preferred residential and non-residential building material for improved fire safety, lower insurance rates, increased property value appreciation, increased energy efficiency, and lower home maintenance costs;

- Building standards for non-residential construction will help attract high-quality commercial development and preserve property values.

An interactive map at www.masonryordinance.com shows where masonry planning has been adopted in Texas.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 05 February 2014 10:35