Past, Present And Future

Dan Kamys, Editor –
dkamys@masonrymagazine.com

Are you getting used to the new look and feel of the magazine? I hope so. You might continue to see some minor updates and refreshing throughout the next few months, but that’s only because we want to keep ourselves looking fresh and modern. However, providing relevant and informative content is still the number one focus for the new team dedicated to the magazine.

You may have noticed that in our last issue, we provided a Spanish translation for one of our articles. In this issue, you will see another translation in our magazine. At first, we’re going to start by translating the most pertinent stories for our Spanish-speaking audience. Eventually, the goal is to have a large portion (potentially all) of our magazine translated into Spanish. We understand the need and opportunity to reach a large portion of the existing and potential workforce and are committed to reaching them.

Masonry is a different animal from anything that I’ve worked on previously. Before, I was used to trying to squeeze the maximum dollars out of the websites I ran and really put the readers and users behind the numbers. Here, it’s the complete opposite. Our first priority is to give our readers what they want and open their eyes to new topics and ways of thinking about issues. In that sense, Masonry is unique in that it’s backed by the Mason Contractors Association of America and not run by a publisher. We are advocates first and foremost.

Sitting at the closing dinner and listening to the Hall of Fame inductees tell me their stories was amazing. In particular, I very much enjoyed hearing the story of George Miller starting the magazine. I’m aware I can sound like a broken record, but the magnitude of the legacy and history of this association and accompanying magazine is incredible. There is nothing else that can remotely compare to the work of the MCAA and Masonry within the industry.

In this issue, you’re going to find most of our coverage on the World of Concrete convention. Congratulations to all the winners of the competitions and thank you to the Hall of Fame inductees and their families for letting the magazine be a small part of the honor.

To all the young masons I met and saw, I say “keep going.” When I looked at the legacies of the Hall of Fame inductees, I couldn’t help but wonder which of the young competitors Masonry could be interviewing as inductees down the line. Future legacies are being built now, and we need to keep working to remind younger and potential professionals of the ability to provide for a family and build an honest, reputable living with masonry.

In a sense, this issue is focused a bit on the legacy and future of masonry. We have our inauguration coverage, convention coverage including competitions and Hall of Fame, a piece on a block design competition for students and the second in our Gen Nxt series with Brandon Hartsell. In case you can’t tell, I’m taking a bit of a sharper angle with this magazine than we used to. The magazine provides a tremendous opportunity to position this industry in a way to reach a new workforce, and we’re going for it as hard as we can.

That being said, I would invite you all to provide me with any suggestions for improvements or content ideas. This magazine is a living thing and each issue should evolve a bit from the last, so let me know your thoughts. Feel free to reach out to me at dkamys@masonrymagazine.com or call the MCAA and ask for me. I look forward to hearing from you!